Cannabis enters into luxury, through exclusive restaurants and spas.

Cannabis enters into luxury, through exclusive restaurants and spas.

Of course, for any layman in the world of cannabis, the uses that this product is developing in those places where it is legalized, may seem very exotic. It’s funny that here we have to sneak around with this matter, while you can go to restaurants or spas in Los Angeles or Colorado, and have a drink with infusional cannabis, or receive a facial with CBD oil.

Those who tolerate and participate without problems of our exacerbated and everlasting culture of alcohol, are able to look with suspicious eyes to those who take a lemon bar with frozen yogurt and raspberry crumble to the CBD, dessert offered by the Hollywood Hotel Rooswelt Los Angeles Your dessert menu with CBD also includes a Bavarian green apple cream and a yogurt panna cotta with macerated berries. Almost nothing.

Let’s not miss the curious phenomenon that occurs when this product is legalized, which was traditionally associated with slums, crime, vice and laziness: it begins to emerge as a luxury product offered in spas and restaurants with a lot of class . From a disheveled guy in Valencia smoking a joint secretly in a park, to a young lady in Los Angeles drinking the infused mojito with cannabis from the Rooswelt hotel, for $ 18 a cup.

What a world so disparate, what contrasts so accentuated can produce the arbitrary illegalization of a plant that has accompanied the human being throughout his history.

Cannabis as a cosmetic is not a novelty either, but the obscure prohibitionism has caused its traditional uses to appear as novel. At the Solage Spa in Napa Valley, California, you can receive exfoliating massages and treatments with between $ 160 and $ 420! There you have it, the silly thing that of the streets incorporated into luxury.

That is only possible because, in reality, dear casual reader with prejudices, cannabis was never the dumb thing that of the streets, more than alcohol could be. We talk about the same distance between a drunkard sucking a bottle of cheap gin in a smelly alley and a gentleman tasting a Château Margaux in a luxury restaurant.

Speaking of spas, the St Julien hotel in Boulder, Colorado, began offering CBD treatments at the request of its clients. Nadene Moccia, one of her masseurs, states that “since marijuana became legal in Colorado, I have had clients ask me if we could give CBD treatments because they had heard about the benefits of well-being, and now I can say yes. ”

Can you imagine that here? Spa clients suggesting to include cannabis in treatments? It gives me that we still have something for that.

Another hotel where you can get out at $ 500 a night, the Thompson Seattle, occasionally organizes a cannabis event consisting of a multi-entry dinner, which combines food with cannabis, either as an ingredient or as a supplement. Imagine marijuana integrated into a menu of beets with herring, scallops with apples and anise and beef cheeks with cauliflower and pecans. The first dinner of this kind organized by the Thompson was free but limited to regular hotel guests. Its owner, Derek Simcik, is considering repeating the event for the general public, obviously charging. “Dinners are fun and it’s not about people getting involved,” he says, despite using marijuana with THC from Lux Pot Shop, a local store that sells recreational marijuana. “We want them to be an innovative way to show marijuana.” Innovative … and surely expensive. Very expensive

Of course, what we really ask for is neither one nor the other, but the path of the Buddha, that of the middle, that is, to be able to access quality products, with sanitary guarantees and reasonable prices, as is happening in Canada, a country that we can hardly associate with the negative values ​​with which insists on identifying cannabis in almost the entire world. From there, you can develop a luxury market, so great for those who can afford € 200 in a massage or € 20 in a glass.